°°Le Forum de l'Education Canine & des Méthodes Positives & Amicales°°


 
AccueilRechercherS'enregistrerConnexion
Derniers sujets
» Prédation sur animaux, instinct de chasse
Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Emptypar EnergieSolaire Aujourd'hui à 10:53

» Possessivité/défense des ressources
Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Emptypar philo Aujourd'hui à 10:47

» Eviter les jeux de lancer de balle, de bâton ou de pouic-pouic: pourquoi?
Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Emptypar Manoon Aujourd'hui à 8:07

» Formation comportementaliste/éducateur canin BELGIQUE
Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Emptypar EnergieSolaire Hier à 20:55

» Court après les voitures
Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Emptypar philo Lun 18 Nov 2019 - 19:39

» VAE pour BP Educateur Canin ?
Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Emptypar Manoon Lun 18 Nov 2019 - 9:00

» Les races à nez fendu
Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Emptypar Ptit'LU Lun 18 Nov 2019 - 0:32

» Zen-O-Vet: le comportement... vu par la science!
Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Emptypar Kaïnate Ven 15 Nov 2019 - 22:41

» Carnet de bord de ma troupe!
Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Emptypar philo Ven 15 Nov 2019 - 11:06

Sujets similaires
Connexion
Nom d'utilisateur:
Mot de passe:
Connexion automatique: 
:: Récupérer mon mot de passe
Annonces

A propos du Forum

Nous tenons à préciser que ce forum a été créé dans le but de vous faire découvrir la possibilité d'une éducation utilisant une approche positive et respectueuse de votre chien.

Si vous avez des problèmes avec votre ou vos chiens, nous vous recommandons vivement de faire appel à un éducateur canin spécialisé en rééducation comportementale ou à un comportementaliste (utilisant le renforcement positif et aucun outil coercitif, cela va sans dire).

Les explications et conseils donnés sur ce forum ne sont là que pour vous orienter et vous informer des possibilités qui vous sont offertes pour éduquer votre compagnon à quatre pattes.

L'Equipe du Forum

Asso’ Bêtes de Scène

Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Bds-lo10
L'association « Bêtes de Scène » (association de protection animale de loi 1901) est située près de Bain de Bretagne (35).

Plus d'infos sur le site
CLICK!
& sur le forum
CLICK!


Partagez
 

 Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage?

Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
AuteurMessage
pycashu31
Compte inactif
Compte inactif


Nb de messages : 2489

Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage?   Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 EmptyVen 14 Mar 2014 - 12:57

Oui, j'ai était en MFR, donc en stage 2 semaine sur 2 je n'est JAMAIS était payer.
A l'époque j'était une rebelle de la foret et je me payer seul  Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 2937756766
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
sosoe
Compte inactif
Compte inactif


Nb de messages : 809

Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage?   Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 EmptyVen 14 Mar 2014 - 13:13

Moi je m'en rend pas trop compte pour ce qui est d'être payer au black (bah oui je suis encore jeune Very Happy ) mais j'imagine les conséquences.

pycashu31 a écrit:
A l'époque j'était une rebelle de la foret et je me payer seul  Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 2937756766

 Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 2282034001 
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
PowerUser
 
 
PowerUser

Féminin
Nb de messages : 44319
Age : 43
Localisation : Dans la matrice! ^^
Emploi : Oracle

Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage?   Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 EmptyLun 9 Nov 2015 - 23:53

Citation :
“It’s all in how they’re raised.”
Posted on December 10, 2012 | 114 Comments

“All puppies are blank slates.” “If you do everything right with your puppy, you’ll have a great adult dog.” “If dogs have behavioral issues, we should blame the handle end of the leash.”

These are common misconceptions I hear as a trainer, and they make me so very sad. Behavior is a combination of nature and nurture, and if we could just take a moment to look logically at these myths, we would see just how silly they are.

Genetics influence behavior. This is part of the reason we have breeds: if you want a dog to work your sheep, you’re going to choose a Border Collie, not a Brittany Spaniel. Even though the two dogs have the same basic size and shape, one is more likely to have the instinctive motor patterns to do the work than the other. Getting a Border Collie whose parents successfully work sheep further increases the likelihood of your dog having the necessary genetic ability to be a great sheepherder.

In the 1970’s, Murphree and colleagues began to study the difference between normal and fearful lines of Pointers. In cross-fostering experiments, puppies from fearful parents were raised by normal mothers. These puppies still turned out fearful, in spite of proper socialization and a confident role model.

Interestingly, puppies from normal parents who were raised by fearful mothers also turned out fearful. Environment also influences behavior, and the best genetics in the world can’t create the perfect dog without a supportive upbringing.

If we believe that the way a dog is raised is solely responsible for his adult behavior, how can the tremendous success of the Pit Bulls from Michael Vick’s kennel and many other fighting operations be explained? With their neglectful and abusive upbringing, we would expect these dogs to be vicious and unsalvageable. Yet many of them have gone on to become wonderful pets. Some compete in agility or work as certified therapy dogs. Many Pit Bull enthusiasts are adamant that it’s all in how the dogs are raised, yet the success of many former fighting dogs tells us that it’s more than just that. These amazing, resilient dogs also have to have a sound genetic basis to explain their ability to overcome adversity.

On the other end of the spectrum, many of my clients have done everything right, yet continue to struggle with anxiety or aggression issues in their dogs. Certain lines of Golden Retrievers are known for severe resource guarding issues that often show up even in tiny puppies. Most of my German Shepherd behavioral consults occur when these dogs hit 12-18 months and growl at or bite a stranger. Miniature Australian Shepherds are likely to come to me due to extreme fear issues at 6-10 months of age. Terrier owners often call me when their dog hits social maturity and begins fighting with housemate dogs. While these traits may be common in my area, trainers in other areas of the country report completely different issues in the same breeds due to different lines of dogs with different genetic potentials living and being bred near them. I also see hundreds of friendly, stable, solid Goldens, German Shepherds, mini Aussies, and terriers in our Beginning Obedience and Puppy Kindergarten classes.

The truth is that dogs are born with a certain genetic potential that will influence which behavioral traits they display. This could include a dog’s sociability towards people, dogs, or other animals; their level of boldness or fearfulness; their likelihood to display anxious or compulsive behaviors; whether they are calm and confident or nervous and neurotic; and many other behavioral factors.

Let’s look at one trait to make this more clear. We know that dogs born from fearful parents are more likely to be fearful and that dogs with bold parents are more likely to be bold. There is a behavioral continuum, with boldness on one end and fearfulness on the other. Here’s what that spectrum would look like. A dog on the left end of the spectrum would be incredibly fearful, while a dog on the right end would be exceedingly confident. Most dogs wind up somewhere in the middle, and dogs on both ends of the spectrum present challenges for their owners.

A dog with bold parents is born with the potential to be quite bold. He is physically capable of bold behavior. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean that he will become a bold dog. If his experiences as a puppy and young adult are very limited or if he has negative, scary experiences, he may develop into a fearful adult due to environmental influence. His genetic potential gave him the ability to be bold, but his environment did not nurture that ability.

On the other hand, consider a dog who is born from fearful parents. This dog does not have the genetic potential to be bold. Even given an incredibly supportive and nurturing environment as a puppy and young adult, this dog will always be somewhat fearful because the physical ability to be bold is just not there.

These dogs may present identically when we look at their behavior, in spite of the very different levels of dedication their owners had to socializing and supporting their puppies. However, the genetically bold dog may make a lot of progress with appropriate behavioral interventions, while the genetically fearful dog makes little or none. This has nothing to do with the skill level of each dog’s owner, but rather with the raw material each dog started with. (This is also, by the way, why ethical trainers do not make guarantees: without knowing what genetic package a dog starts with, there’s no way to know how much progress that dog can make until we try.)

Do you see how very unfair statements about how “it’s all in how they’re raised” are to committed, wonderful dog owners who have dogs with more difficult baselines? Just because your dog flew through a behavior mod program doesn’t mean every dog can or will, and assuming that it’s all because of the owner is unrealistic and downright cruel. I regularly work with wonderful people who do the best they can with difficult dogs, and that adage about walking a mile in someone’s shoes is applicable to their situation. As if living with and training a more difficult dog weren’t enough, these people are often subjected to comments and insinuations that if they were just a better handler, a better trainer, or a better leader, their dog would be perfectly fine. This is untrue and incredibly hurtful, and it needs to stop.

https://paws4udogs.wordpress.com/2012/12/10/its-all-in-how-theyre-raised/

Et en français, ça donne ça: http://sharpei-attitude.fr/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Inne-acquis.pdf

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Grumpy-cat-01Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Ocd_grumpy_cat_by_linai-d6cqykpQu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 3b965034881fb4956e7b1074a6ebd59b--grumpy-cat-cartoon-cat-cartoonsQu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 87e19bb336784685fb937b4b8e5c7202
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://www.dogstardaily.com/
Contenu sponsorisé




Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage?   Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage? - Page 7 Empty

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Qu'est-ce qu'un bon élevage?
Revenir en haut 
Page 7 sur 7Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
 Sujets similaires
-
» levage à la chèvre...élévation des murs
» Mon petit élevage de chevaux de Pure Race Espagnole
» Batiment d'élevage
» Levage moteur 6 cyl D 2,4
» élevage faisan

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
°°Le Forum de l'Education Canine & des Méthodes Positives & Amicales°° :: LES CHIENS :: * DIVERS: sujets canins *-
Sauter vers: